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Posts Tagged ‘Gatchaman Crowds’

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While Gatchaman Crowds was good fun, I feel like its focus on being an action series left its social commentary and more thoughtful discussions on social media a little in the lurch. That side needed a bit more focus and attention to really bring it out fully. There was still some fantastic discussion going and it’s a great text to read, but I imagine a lot of it would be lost on most people as it jumped around a bit too much and didn’t make its goals clear. It was, in short, a bit confusing. Rewarding as hell once you picked it apart and gave it a good analysis, but if you hadn’t gone out of your way to take that step – and it’s not like the show compels you to do so either – it would come across a bit muddled.

Gatchaman Crowds Insight represented the perfect opportunity to really improve on that and deliver itself to greatness. Spoiler alert: it succeeds, handily. But even knowing that it would obviously be trying to do that, I definitely did not expect the direction it took.

Just as a heads up, this review does contain a fair few mid-story spoilers. It’s mostly that discussing what it accomplishes requires discussing some major aspects of the plot which are pretty far removed from how the show begins, so you may well lose out on some of the pretty cool surprises in store. I’ve largely avoided major twists, however – consider this your warning, just in case.

“YES! Finally more Gatchaman Crowds!!”

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Gatchaman Crowds

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It’s an undeniable fact that the social and information structure of the current world has been dominated by social media – by the desire to share and opine from people of all walks of life and social stature. The signal-to-noise ratio is abysmal, of course, but the way that society is now more connected and linked than ever before, and how information can propagate globally within minutes as a result, is nothing short of fascinating and unprecedented. But despite social media’s importance and prominence, I can’t help but feel that there haven’t really been any meaningful attempts to explore and utilise it in fiction, to make it a core concept and central theme of an entire narrative. There haven’t really been any stories I’ve encountered that got it.

Enter Gatchaman Crowds. Bearing the same name as an ancient sci-fi anime franchise yet having basically no connection to it in any way, Gatchaman Crowds revolves around a group of young superheroes (of the regular-ish people who transform style) chosen by a quiet and mysterious God-like individual, an obscenely popular and powerful social network that encourages and rewards individuals using their unique abilities to help others known as GALAX, and an insane, maniacal villain who aims to destroy the entire world, all set in a very near-future Japan. And it’s bright and stylish as all fuck.

Gatcha!

Gatcha!

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